New York de Blasio delighted: Checkpoints, forced imprisonment, $10,000 fines

New York City sets up quarantine checkpoints as it toughens state travel restrictions

New York City is setting up quarantine checkpoints at “key entry points” along main bridges and tunnels to the city to screen travelers coming from more than 30 states with bad coronavirus outbreaks, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday.

“Travelers coming in from those states will be given information about the quarantine, they will be reminded that it is required, not optional,” de Blasio said at a press briefing. “They’ll be reminded that failure to quarantine is a violation of state law and it comes with serious penalties.” The checkpoints will begin Wednesday.

Dr. Ted Long, head of New York City’s Test & Trace Corps, said that a fifth of all new coronavirus cases in New York City are from out-of-state travelers.

The new agency is deploying teams to Penn Station and the Port Authority Bus Terminal starting Thursday. They are checking in on travelers through calls and text messages, “and if we can’t get through to you on the phone, we’ve deployed teams that are now knocking on your door and making sure you’re safe,” Long said.

“We want you to come into New York City, but we need you to safely separate for two weeks when you arrive to keep New York City safe,” he said.

Long said the city will help those quarantining with free food deliveries, assistance with medications, telehealth services or “even a hotel stay.”

“We know that it’s not easy to get through a two-week period of safe separation, but it’s incredibly important and were going to do everything in our power to help you,” Long said.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, alongside New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, issued the joint travel advisory in late June, ordering travelers from states with a significant Covid-19 communitywide spread to self-quarantine for 14 days. The original order applied to only nine states.

New York had previously stationed “enforcement teams” from the the state’s Department of Health at the city’s major airports to ensure compliance with the advisory. All passengers from incoming flights from states on the advisory are required to fill out a traveler form.

The city has also partnered with hotels, train, bus and car rental companies, requiring anyone booking a stay in New York City to fill out a travel form so the Test & Trace Corps can locate them and monitor travelers in isolation, Long said.

People who violate the state’s order will be subject to fines and a mandatory quarantine, Cuomo said. He said the fines will be $2,000 for the first violation, $5,000 for the second and up to $10,000 if they cause harm.

“We need to make sure that quarantine becomes stronger every day. That that law comes to life more every day” de Blasio said.

Feast of St. Dominic and a lesson in the power of prayer

Happy feast! I’m sure you already know a little about St. Dominic, the Order of Preachers he founded, and perhaps some of his life story as a hammer of heretics. But there is a little hidden gem of wisdom that needs to be pointed out to some, especially now.

St. Dominic was born to fight the Albigensian heresy. The Albingensians were really, really messed up HERE. St. Dominic eventually decided on structuring his order in a different way; there would be no monastery, rather the friars would be itinerant mendicants, literally fighting heresy in the streets. But he also knew that the ground tactics would never work without a hidden spiritual army. 

So Dominic, fully ten years prior to establishing the Order of Preachers, first established a cloister of sisters. Prayer warriors. Anytime you are tempted to think that prayer is “the least we can do,” remember this. We can do nothing without prayer. Our best plans/designs/corporeal actions are in vain, without prayer. How was Dominic so wise as to know this ahead of time? The Blessed Virgin bestowing the Rosary upon him probably didn’t hurt.

I have written many times on the importance/necessity of prayer. Not only contemplatives in cloisters, but in your own life. Last Saturday, 1 August, was the Feast of St. Peter in Chains (pre-1955 calendar). A fairly, ahem, relevant feast given the current incarceration of Pope Benedict XVI, wouldn’t you say? Here is the Lesson from the Mass proper.

Did you catch that?

“Peter therefore was kept in prison, but prayer was made without ceasing from the Church unto God for him.”

For anyone out there whining about the situation in Rome, but claiming “there’s nothing we can do,” show them this. The people prayed, and God sent an angel to bust Peter out. This isn’t a fairy tale.

Pray with joyful hope; Second Glorious Mystery. Pray with trust in Mary’s intercession; Fifth Glorious Mystery.

Prayer works.

Bishop Barron employs three full-time staffers to scrub truth from the internet all day

Proudly reported by NCRonline.org HERE.

Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron hosted an invite-only meeting of Catholic media professionals last week to discuss “disturbing trends in the online Catholic world,” including the rise of “radical Traditionalist” movements that are often marked by personal attacks and vitriolic commentary.

The private meeting took place July 29 via Zoom and was confirmed to NCR by Brandon Vogt, content director for Word on Fire Catholic Ministries.

Vogt said the meeting of Catholic media professionals discussed the online behavior of traditionalists who “ruthlessly criticize the pope and bishops, and question the authority of the Second Vatican Council, often to the point of repudiation.”

While neither Barron nor Vogt specifically identified individuals or organizations responsible for targeted online attacks, much of the criticism directed at Barron has been fueled by fringe right-wing sites such as LifeSiteNews and Church Militant.

This is not the first time that Barron has puzzled over how to control the fractured nature of online Catholic commentary. In an interview with National Catholic Register earlier this year, he suggested that bishops may want to consider introducing “something like a mandatum for those who claim to teach the Catholic faith online, whereby a bishop affirms that the person is teaching within the full communion of the Church.”

 

Better Gloria.tv coverage HERE.

Present on the call were America Media (Jesuits), Catholic News Agency (EWTN), Catholic News Service (US bishops), CruxNow.com (sponsored also by Barron), and Our Sunday Visitor (U.S. National Weekly Newspaper).

The meeting also spoke about the phenomenon of tabloid news in the Catholic press. White describes the traditionalists more or less correctly as often young Catholics who prefer the traditional liturgy and subscribe to more conservative political beliefs and religious practices.

In recent weeks, Barron was criticised by Catholic media for defending indefensible parts of Vatican II. Barron reacted by saying that he preferred the online pushback of atheists to certain Catholics. He complained during the meeting that three full-time staff members spend their whole workdays deleting “inappropriate” comments levelled at him.

“COVID is here to stay: We will be dealing with this forever.”

They really hate you. Do you know what they have planned for you?


THE PATH FORWARD

Even with vaccine, ‘We will be dealing with this forever’: Virus experts Frieden, Osterholm

Two of the country’s top infectious disease experts presented a sobering look at the battle still to come against Covid-19. Their message, conveyed during a recent CNBC event, was encapsulated in related views on how much of a difference a coronavirus vaccine can make and what reaching herd immunity in the U.S. population will mean for life across the nation.

“Even with a vaccine, there is no going back to normal anytime soon,” said Thomas Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaking at a CNBC Workforce Executive Council virtual event to human resources executives on July 23 about a safe return to the workplace. “Prepare for at least eight to 12 months of this situation,” said Frieden, who now runs the Resolve to Save Lives disease prevention organization.

Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy at the University of Minnesota, said it is estimated that 7% to 9% of the total U.S. population has been infected with coronavirus, and that means the worst is yet to come. He said the best understanding in the medical field is that transmission will not slow down until 50% to 70% of the population is infected.

“The pain, suffering, death and economic pain we’ve had to date — that’s 7% to 9% of the U.S. population. We’ve got a long way to go,” Osterholm said.

Covid is ‘here to stay’

For businesses and the U.S. economy, that means there will be no “V-shaped” return to workplaces.

“Most businesses in the country will be hard-pressed to operate in a way they want to schedule when we have ‘houses on fire’ in our communities,” said Osterholm. “I understand the pain and economic suffering, but I don’t see any way we get numbers down regionally. We’ve got to stop this virus activity or there will be fear we will see these peaks, but every time it goes down, it plateaus at a higher level and just comes back again. In many communities in this country, I see no way to operate as they once did.”

Cases have started to show some signs of slowing in recent hot spots across the U.S. South and Southwest, including Florida, Texas and Arizona.

In fact, both experts believe Covid-19 is here to stay.

“We will be dealing with this forever,” Osterholm said.

“Covid is here to stay,” added Frieden.

Frieden said one of the biggest issues is that the medical community still lacks good data on the disease, but he added, “Nothing we’ve seen suggests it will just go away.”

That’s why the measures being advocated that may seem like “blunt” tools, from extreme physical distancing in the workplace to remote work as the norm, are the best options we have to stop the virus. Countries that moved quickly to rapid testing and tracing and quarantine were able to get Covid-19 under control more quickly, but the U.S. is too far behind on that more precise tool, “the box-it-in strategy,” Frieden said.

If a vaccine becomes available over the next six to 12 months and we can produce enough of the vaccine for the population, there are still big question marks about its effectiveness, Frieden said. This week the first vaccine to go into a large-scale Phase 3 trial, from Moderna Therapeutics, started toward its goal of enrolling 30,000 individuals. But the scientific community still does not know how long a vaccine will be effective for, and whether immunity within elderly individuals will last. It also is not known about any side effects, as well as the percentage of the population that may refuse to get the vaccine.

“We have great vaccines and still 100,000 deaths a year from measles,” Frieden said, speaking about Africa. “In the U.S. we still have hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations from flu each year with vaccines, and it looks more likely than not that this virus keeps circulating even with a vaccine.”

Osterholm, who has studied the coronavirus class of infectious diseases around the world, including MERS and SARS, said these viruses are “notoriously famous for not granting durable immunity.” He added, “We will be revaccinating on an annual basis.”

Much we don’t know about face masks

One of the blunt tools the U.S. has been using with more frequency is a requirement to wear a face mask, including in workplaces. Research is starting to emerge showing the value of masks in protecting both wearers and those with whom they come into contact, but Osterholm said while wearing a mask is among the best advice we have today, there are problems. First, the masks where data has been strongest are the N95 masks that are used to protect health-care workers, and there is no way we can make those masks available to the general public.

“We have to save those for health-care workers,” Osterholm said, noting that in Minnesota intensive-care units for Covid-19, health-care workers are wearing N95 masks 10 days in a row.”

But he urged everyone to wear a covering.

“Face-cloth covers are not surgical or N95, but wear ‘em, wear ’em,” Osterholm said, even though he added, “We don’t know how well they work.”

The virus expert said distance is the most important protective measure, especially in indoor-air environments, and everything else, including masks, needs to be layered on after that.

Osterholm chided current CDC director Robert Redfield for recently claiming that all we need is masks to drive Covid-19 into the ground in six weeks.

“I thought it was irresponsible,” Osterholm said of Redfield’s claim.

Ford started resuming vehicle production in the U.S. on May 18, 2020 with new coronavirus safety protocols such as health assessments, personal protective equipment and facility modifications to increase social distancing.
Ford

The infectious disease researcher noted that even in regions where citizens can be fined thousands of dollars for not wearing a mask, such as Hong Kong’s public transportation system, we are still seeing problems with Covid-19. We don’t want people to assume masks will make the difference,” Osterholm said.

Another factor, some field work in places like Philadelphia has shown that roughly one-quarter of everyone wearing face-cloth coverings are wearing them under the nose.

Frieden said there is not a lot of data available on the effectiveness of full face shields, but the bottom line is that people need to be wearing some kind of face covering when they are in any indoor environment. There has been a lot of discussion about the need for updated HVAC systems to provide ventilation never considered necessary before Covid-19, but the former CDC director said becoming infected by touching a doorknob or elevator in a building is more probable than contracting the virus due to an AC system, which was the case with SARS.

“One thing we need to do is know there is no one thing we need to do,” Frieden said. “If anyone tells you they know this virus, don’t trust them,” he added.

Living in a ’24/7 Covid world’

Osterholm said anyone who does not know a person who has become infected or died from coronavirus should heed his personal warning about indoor air and large gatherings. He recently warned family members in his hometown of Waukon, Iowa, to not hold a weekend indoor reception for a high school graduate.

“Despite warnings by others, they had it. There was an outbreak that occurred. … On Wednesday, Grandpa died, and on Friday, Grandma died, both previously healthy. That’s what we are talking about,” the world-renowned epidemiologist said.

As businesses and schools attempt to return workers and students, “clever approaches,” such as four days at the workplace followed by 10 days at home in a form of quarantine, need to be tried, Frieden said. But he warned that the models are only as good as the data we have, and that data is not great today. “It is certainly valid to try and see, and the same goes for schools. I’m not saying we should experiment on kids, but we don’t know the right way to do it,” Frieden said.

Some businesses will continue to rely on remote work when possible and delay returns to physical workplaces. Alphabet announced on Monday it is extending its work-from-home order for any workers who do not need to be in the office until next summer. Businesses need to create a feedback loop to evaluate what is working as they try various ideas such as “de-densifying” the workplace. But the former CDC director warned that as Americans return to work and school, there is no such thing as a “work life” or “school life.”

We are all living “Covid lives” now, he said, and that means workers who demand workforce safety measures but then go to a bar with friends at night are invalidating all the efforts during the day to make the workplace safe.

Individuals will need to understand that going back to work means making significant trade-offs in their personal lives, because it is impossible to know where the explosive spread in a community will start, but we do know how disruptive it will be.

“There is no 100% safe other than everyone staying at home, which is too difficult,” Frieden said. “We will be living in a 24/7 Covid world eventually,” he said.

Professor Enrico Maria Radaelli endorses the Mazza Thesis

Crosspost from barnhardt.biz

Professor Enrico Maria Radaelli is the top living disciple of Romano Amerio, the great theologian who wrote the seminal critique of Vatican II and its devastating aftermath, “Iota Unum“. Prof. Radaelli sent the following letter to Dr. Mazza. This translation has been approved for publication. We all look forward to Prof. Radaelli’s forthcoming publications on the invalid resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, and share in Prof. Radaelli’s admiration and praise of Dr. Mazza’s work.

Dear Prof. Mazza,

I congratulate you for the dexterity with which you have composed your argument, and, if I may, I have jotted down here and there some short notes to make your text radiate in perfect truth, as it deserves.

What should be appreciated more than anything else is your intuition to focus on canon 188 (which is much more decisive and germane than 332 § 2), and was totally violated by the Renunciation, because: 1) 188 strikes at the root of the heretical act; 2), it strikes a decisive blow to the act in its substance.

Secondly, your attempt, which was completely successful, to expose the formal status of The “Emeritus”, under the linguistic cloak of which the Subject has attempted to hide himself, must be appreciated. It is the decisive issue, and I congratulate you.

May everyone soon greatly appreciate your arguments, which will help bring the Church back to the riverbed of logical truth in which she should always reside in holiness.

Professor Enrico Maria Radaelli

International Science and Commonsense Association (ISCA)

Department of Metaphysics of Beauty and Philosophy of Arts,

Research Director and Professor of Formal Gnoseology

Vee haf vays: FedGov/NIH asks Yale to determine most effective means to propagandize corona vaccine

Folks, this is happening. You need to prepare yourself.

See if you can spot some of the tactics which have already been deployed to force the closure of businesses, mandatory masking, forced quarantine of the healthy, etc.

Pro tip: Read to the end; it gets better as you go along.

Source: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04460703

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This study tests different messages about vaccinating against COVID-19 once the vaccine becomes available. Participants are randomized to 1 of 12 arms, with one control arm and one baseline arm. We will compare the reported willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine at 3 and 6 months of it becoming available between the 10 intervention arms to the 2 control arms.

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Up to 650K people die from the boring seasonal flu every year, but now we want face shields

The worldwide (greatly inflated) death count for corona just passed 650K.

For perspective, the WHO reminds you that it is not unusual for the normal, regular, seasonal flu to do the same, without having to destroy the lives of everyone in the world.

Screenshot 2020-07-30 at 16.38.22

Link HERE.

Never, in any flu year, have masks ever been discussed. But now, Fraudci is floating goggles as the next step HERE.

Not to be outdone, the wicked witch of the scarf goes for full face shields. Because “you can decorate them,” you know.

CDC Director: Threat Of Suicide, Drugs, Flu To Youth ‘Far Greater’ Than Covid

Makes sense, since we are now finding out that the biggest hospitalization/mortality surge is being caused by suicide attempts and drug overdoses. In a society without supernatural faith, despair comes at you really, really fast.

During a Buck Institute Webinar streamed on July 14, Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield promoted the general reopening of schools, highlighting the low coronavirus risk for children without preexisting conditions and the unfortunate spike in suicides and drug overdoses, which Redfield said are “far greater” in number than COVID-linked deaths in the young. HERE

“It’s not risk of school openings versus public health. It’s public health versus public health,” asserted Redfield.

“I’m of the point of view, and I weigh that equation as an individual that has 11 grandchildren that the greater risk is actually to the nation to keep these schools closed,” he continued.

Redfield said that over 7 million children get mental health services from their school, “a lot of people get food and nutrition in schools,” and added that schools are vital “in terms of mandatory reporting sexual and child abuse.”

“Obviously, the socialization is important,” he said.

Obvious, yes. So obvious that this problem was already laid out in early May, and in fact much early than that, in terms of the broader dynamic across the broader population:


 

Anxiety From Reactions to Covid-19 Will Destroy At Least Seven Times More Years of Life Than Can Be Saved by Lockdowns

By Andrew Glen, Ph.D. and James D. Agresti
May 4, 2020

SOURCE

Medical studies show that excessive stress and anxiety are among the most debilitating and deadly of all health hazards in the world. Beyond their obvious effects like suicide and substance abuse—these mental stressors are strongly related to and may trigger and inflame a host of ailments like high blood pressure, digestive disorders, heart conditions, infectious diseases, cancer, and pregnancy complications.

Based on a broad array of scientific data, Just Facts has computed that the anxiety created by reactions to Covid-19—such as stay-at-home orders, business shutdowns, media exaggerations, and legitimate concerns about the virus—will destroy at least seven times more years of human life than can possibly be saved by lockdowns to control the spread of the disease. This figure is a bare minimum, and the actual one is likely more than 90 times greater.

This study was reviewed by Joseph P. Damore, Jr., M.D., who concluded: “This research is engaging and thoroughly answers the question about the cure being worse than the disease.” Dr. Damore is a certified diplomate with the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University, an assistant attending psychiatrist at New York Presbyterian Hospital, and an adjunct professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership at the U.S. Military Academy.

Stress and Anxiety Levels

Scientific surveys of U.S. residents have found that the mental health of about one-third to one-half of all adults has been substantially compromised by reactions to the Covid-19 pandemic. Examples include the following:

  • An American Psychiatric Association survey in mid-March found that 36% of adults report that anxiety over Covid-19 “is having a serious impact on their mental health.”
  • Kaiser Family Foundation survey in late March found that 45% of adults “feel that worry and stress related to” Covid-19 “has had a negative impact on their mental health, an increase from 32% from early March.” Additionally, 19% of adults said it is having a “major impact” on their mental health.
  • Benenson Strategy Group survey in late March revealed that the Covid-19 “situation has already affected” the “mental health” of 55% of U.S. adults “either a great deal or somewhat.”
  • Kaiser Family Foundation survey in late April found that 56% of adults “report that worry and stress related to” Covid-19 “is affecting their mental health and wellbeing in various ways,” such as “trouble sleeping, “poor appetite or over-eating,” “frequent headaches or stomachaches,” “difficulty controlling their temper,” “increasing their alcohol or drug use,” and “worsening chronic conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure.”

Contributors to these mental health impacts include but are not limited to:

  • empirically grounded concerns about the virus.
  • anguish over the death of loved ones, although this is limited to a relatively small fraction of the public because the virus has killed one out of every 5,000 Americans, while one out of every 116 Americans die every year.
  • media outlets that overstate the deadliness of Covid-19 by:
  • government stay-at-home orders and self-imposed isolation, as evidenced by:
    • survey commissioned by the University of Phoenix in late March that found 44% of U.S. adults are more lonely than they have ever been in their lives, which is a risk factor for suicide and many other psychologically driven fatal afflictions.
    • the late-March Kaiser Family Foundation survey, which “found that 47% of those sheltering in place reported negative mental health effects resulting from worry or stress,” a rate that “is significantly higher than the 37% among people who were not sheltering in place.”
    • the late-March Benenson Strategy Group survey, which found that “71% of Americans say they are concerned that ‘social distancing’ measures will have a negative impact on the country’s mental health—including 28% who are extremely or very concerned about this.”
  • government-mandated shutdowns of businesses in nearly every state that have cost millions of jobs and are reflected in the:
    • late-April Kaiser Family Foundation survey, which found that 35% of adults and 55% of workers “have lost their jobs or had a reduction in hours or pay as a result of” responses to Covid-19.
    • mid-March American Psychiatric Association survey, which found that 57% of adults are concerned that responses to the pandemic “will have a serious negative impact on their finances,” and 68% fear it “will have a long-lasting impact on the economy.”

Among all of the figures above, the lowest nationwide measure of people who have incurred psychological harm from reactions to Covid-19 is the 19% of adults in the late-March Kaiser Family Foundation survey who reported a “major impact” on their mental health. This survey included 1,226 respondents and has a margin of sampling error for this result of ± 2.2 percentage points with 95% confidence.

Therefore, at least 16.8% of 255,200,373 adults in the United States—or 42,873,663 people—have suffered major mental harm from responses to Covid-19. This figure forms the first key basis of this study.

The Deadliness of Anxiety and Stress

Medical journals are rich with studies that attempt to measure the lethality of stress, anxiety, depression, and other psychological conditions. Determining this is very difficult because association does not prove causation, and unmeasured factors could be at play.

For example, a 2011 meta-analysis in the journal Social Science & Medicine about mortality, “psychosocial stress,” and job losses finds that “unemployment is associated with a substantially increased risk of death among broad segments of the population,” but there are conflicting theories as to why this is so. One is that “unemployment causes adverse changes in health behaviors, which in turn lead to deterioration of health.” Put simply, unemployment causes bad health. The other theory is that bad health causes unemployment. Both of these theories may be true, and factors that are not measured in the studies could be causing both unemployment and bad health. Thus, it is very difficult to isolate these variables and determine which is causing the others and to what degree.

While trying to address such uncertainty, the meta-analysis examined “235 mortality risk estimates from 42 studies” and found that “unemployment is associated with a 63% higher risk of mortality in studies controlling for covariates.”

Regardless of whether job losses from Covid-19 lockdowns are brief or sustained, the study found that the death correlation “is significant in both the short and long term,” lending “some support to the hypothesis and previous findings that both the stress and the negative lifestyle effects associated with the onset of unemployment tend to persist even after a person has regained a job.”

Also of relevance to current job losses, the study indicates that added unemployment benefits, like those recently passed into federal law, are unlikely to mitigate the deadliness of job losses. This is because the meta-analysis found that the associations between unemployment and death in Scandinavia and the U.S. are not significantly different, even though the Scandinavian nations offer more generous welfare benefits. Thus, the authors conclude that “these national-level policy differences may not have much of an effect on the rate of mortality following unemployment.”

A broad range of other studies have similar implications for anxiety-related deaths wrought by reactions to Covid-19:

  • 1991 study published by the New England Journal of Medicine found that “psychological stress was associated in a dose-response manner with an increased risk of acute infectious respiratory illness.” A dose-response relationship, as explained by epidemiologist Sydney Pettygrove, “is one in which increasing levels of exposure are associated with either an increasing or a decreasing risk of the outcome.” She notes that when this pattern occurs, it “is considered strong evidence for a causal relationship between the exposure and the outcome.”
  • 2004 paper in The Lancet documents that “stress and depression result in an impairment of the immune response and might promote the initiation and progression of some types of cancer….” The paper details many human and animal studies germane to the Covid-19 lockdowns, such as those dealing with a “lack of social interactions” that cause certain cancers to metastasize.
  • 2005 paper in the Journal of Experimental Medicine finds that “psychological conditions, including stress” trigger a “sophisticated molecular mechanism” that increases “the likelihood of infections, autoimmunity, or cancer.”
  • 2012 meta-analysis in the British Medical Journal finds “a dose-response association between psychological distress and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and external causes across the full range of distress, even in people who would not usually come to the attention of mental health services.” Furthermore, “these associations remained after adjustment for age, sex, current occupational social class, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and diabetes.” People with the lowest levels of psychological distress in this study had a 20% greater risk of death, and those with the highest levels had a 94% greater risk.
  • 2012 paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry analyzes the death rates of more than a million young males in Sweden who underwent a government-mandated military draft physical that “included a structured interview by a psychologist” during 1969 to 1994. This study is particularly relevant to the effects of the current Covid-19 anxiety because it involves nearly all the healthy young men of a nation and excludes those with “severe” mental or physical disorders because they were excused from the exam. The study finds:
    • Young men who were diagnosed with neurotic and adjustment disorders were 76% more likely to die in the average follow-up period of 22.6 years. A neurotic disorder is a problem dealing with anxiety, and an adjustment disorder—which is now called “stress response syndrome”—is “a short-term condition that occurs when a person has great difficulty coping with, or adjusting to, a particular source of stress, such as a major life change, loss, or event.” These are apt descriptions of the tens of millions of Americans who report that reactions to Covid-19 are seriously harming their mental health.
    • Premature deaths associated with mental illness “are not primarily due to suicide or accidents, although risk of both is increased, but to a range of natural causes, particularly cardiovascular disease.” This suggests that the most pervasive harm from lockdowns does not manifest in obvious ways like suicides and overdoses.
  • 2015 paper in the American Journal of Epidemiology examines the death rates of all “Danes who received a diagnosis of reaction to severe stress or adjustment disorders” between 1995 and 2011. The study found that they “had mortality rates during the study period that were 2.2 times higher than” those of the general population.
  • 2015 meta-analysis in the Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry provides a systematic review of 148 studies of death and mental disorders with follow-up times ranging from one to 52 years, with a median of 10 years. It finds that the overall risk of death among people with mental disorders is 2.2 times that of the general population. Breaking these results out by condition, the mortality increases were:
    • 43% for people with anxiety.
    • 71% for people with depression
    • 110% for people with mood disorders.
    • 150% for people with psychoses.

Among all of the results above, the smallest risk of increased death is 20% in the 2012 meta-analysis. This has a margin of error from 13% to 27% with 95% confidence. The lower limit of 13% translates to an average of about 1.3 years of lost life per person.

Corroborating that figure, 22 of the studies in the 2015 meta-analysis included estimates for the average years of life lost by each person with a mental disorder. These “ranged from 1.4 to 32 years, with a median of 10.1 years.” None of these studies were for anxiety, but the low-end figure of 1.4 years provides additional evidence that those who suffer serious mental repercussions from responses to Covid-19 will lose an average of more than a year of life.

Therefore, the figure of 1.3 years of lost life is a bare minimum and forms the second key basis of this study. This varies widely by person and could be:

  • 50 years or more for young people who commit suicide.
  • one month or less for elderly persons who have cardiac events triggered by fear or loneliness.
  • two years for the middle-aged people whose blood pressure begins spiking earlier in life than it would have in the absence of Covid-19-related stress.

 

Read the rest HERE.